New rules and limitations for depreciation and expensing under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

News & Publications

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed Dec. 22, 2017, changed some laws regarding depreciation deductions.

Businesses can immediately expense more under the new law

A taxpayer may elect to expense the cost of any section 179 property and deduct it in the year the property is placed in service. The new law increased the maximum deduction from $500,000 to $1 million. It also increased the phase-out threshold from $2 million to $2.5 million.

The new law also expands the definition of section 179 property to allow the taxpayer to elect to include the following improvements made to nonresidential real property after the date when the property was first placed in service:

  • Qualified improvement property, which means any improvement to a building’s interior. Improvements do not qualify if they are attributable to:

    • the enlargement of the building,

    • any elevator or escalator or

    • the internal structural framework of the building.

  • Roofs, HVAC, fire protection systems, alarm systems and security systems.

These changes apply to property placed in service in taxable years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017.

Temporary 100 percent expensing for certain business assets (first-year bonus depreciation)

The new law increases the bonus depreciation percentage from 50 percent to 100 percent for qualified property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2023. The bonus depreciation percentage for qualified property that a taxpayer acquired before Sept. 28, 2017, and placed in service before Jan. 1, 2018, remains at 50 percent. Special rules apply for longer production period property and certain aircraft.

The definition of property eligible for 100 percent bonus depreciation was expanded to include used qualified property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017, if all the following factors apply:

  • The taxpayer didn’t use the property at any time before acquiring it.

  • The taxpayer didn’t acquire the property from a related party.

  • The taxpayer didn’t acquire the property from a component member of a controlled group of corporations.

  • The taxpayer’s basis of the used property is not figured in whole or in part by reference to the adjusted basis of the property in the hands of the seller or transferor.

  • The taxpayer’s basis of the used property is not figured under the provision for deciding basis of property acquired from a decedent.

Also, the cost of the used qualified property eligible for bonus depreciation doesn’t include any carryover basis of the property, for example in a like-kind exchange or involuntary conversion.

The new law added qualified film, television and live theatrical productions as types of qualified property that are eligible for 100 percent bonus depreciation. This provision applies to property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017.

Under the new law, certain types of property are not eligible for bonus depreciation. One such exclusion from qualified property is for property primarily used in the trade or business of the furnishing or sale of:

  • Electrical energy, water or sewage disposal services,

  • Gas or steam through a local distribution system or

  • Transportation of gas or steam by pipeline.

This exclusion applies if the rates for the furnishing or sale have to be approved by a federal, state or local government agency, a public service or public utility commission, or an electric cooperative.

The new law also adds an exclusion for any property used in a trade or business that has floor-plan financing. Floor-plan financing is secured by motor vehicle inventory that a business sells or leases to retail customers.

Changes to depreciation limitations on luxury automobiles and personal use property

The new law changed depreciation limits for passenger vehicles placed in service after Dec. 31, 2017. If the taxpayer doesn’t claim bonus depreciation, the greatest allowable depreciation deduction is:

  • $10,000 for the first year,

  • $16,000 for the second year,

  • $9,600 for the third year, and

  • $5,760 for each later taxable year in the recovery period.

If a taxpayer claims 100 percent bonus depreciation, the greatest allowable depreciation deduction is:

  • $18,000 for the first year,

  • $16,000 for the second year,

  • $9,600 for the third year, and

  • $5,760 for each later taxable year in the recovery period.

The new law also removes computer or peripheral equipment from the definition of listed property. This change applies to property placed in service after Dec. 31, 2017.

Changes to treatment of certain farm property

The new law shortens the recovery period for machinery and equipment used in a farming business from seven to five years. This excludes grain bins, cotton ginning assets, fences or other land improvements. The original use of the property must occur after Dec. 31, 2017. This recovery period is effective for property placed in service after Dec. 31, 2017.

Also, property used in a farming business and placed in service after Dec. 31, 2017, is not required to use the 150 percent declining balance method. However, if the property is 15-year or 20-year property, the taxpayer should continue to use the 150 percent declining balance method.

Applicable recovery period for real property

The new law keeps the general recovery periods of 39 years for nonresidential real property and 27.5 years for residential rental property. But, the new law changes the alternative depreciation system recovery period for residential rental property from 40 years to 30 years. Qualified leasehold improvement property, qualified restaurant property and qualified retail improvement property are no longer separately defined and given a special 15-year recovery period under the new law.

These changes affect property placed in service after Dec. 31, 2017.

Under the new law, a real property trade or business electing out of the interest deduction limit must use the alternative depreciation system to depreciate any of its nonresidential real property, residential rental property, and qualified improvement property. This change applies to taxable years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017.

Use of alternative depreciation system for farming businesses

Farming businesses that elect out of the interest deduction limit must use the alternative depreciation system to depreciate any property with a recovery period of 10 years or more, such as single purpose agricultural or horticultural structures, trees or vines bearing fruit or nuts, farm buildings and certain land improvements. This provision applies to taxable years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017.

 

La Ley de reducción de impuestos y empleos, firmada el 22 de diciembre de 2017, modificó algunas leyes con respecto a las deducciones por depreciación.

 

Las empresas pueden inmediatamente gastar más en virtud de la nueva ley

 

Un contribuyente puede elegir gastar el costo de cualquier propiedad de la sección 179 y deducirlo en el año en que la propiedad se pone en servicio. La nueva ley aumentó la deducción máxima de $ 500,000 a $ 1 millón. También aumentó el umbral de eliminación de $ 2 millones a $ 2,5 millones.

 

La nueva ley también amplía la definición de propiedad de la sección 179 para permitir que el contribuyente elija incluir las siguientes mejoras hechas a bienes inmuebles no residenciales después de la fecha en que la propiedad se puso en servicio por primera vez:

 

Propiedad de mejora calificada, lo que significa cualquier mejora en el interior de un edificio. Las mejoras no califican si son atribuibles a:

 

  • la ampliación del edificio,

  • cualquier ascensor o escalera mecánica o

  • el marco estructural interno del edificio.

  • Techos, HVAC, sistemas de protección contra incendios, sistemas de alarma y sistemas de seguridad.

Estos cambios se aplican a la propiedad puesta en servicio en años contributivos que comiencen después del 31 de diciembre de 2017.

 

Gasto temporal del 100 por ciento para ciertos activos comerciales (depreciación de bonificación del primer año)

 

La nueva ley aumenta el porcentaje de depreciación adicional del 50 al 100 por ciento para la propiedad calificada adquirida y puesta en servicio después del 27 de septiembre de 2017 y antes del 1 de enero de 2023. El porcentaje de depreciación adicional para la propiedad calificada que un contribuyente adquirió antes de septiembre El 28 de febrero de 2017, y se puso en servicio antes del 1 de enero de 2018, permanece en el 50 por ciento. Se aplican reglas especiales para la propiedad del período de producción más prolongado y ciertas aeronaves. La definición de propiedad elegible para la depreciación de bonificación del 100 por ciento se amplió para incluir la propiedad calificada usada adquirida y puesta en servicio después del 27 de septiembre de 2017, si se aplican todos los siguientes factores:

 

  • El contribuyente no usó la propiedad en ningún momento antes de adquirirla.

  • El contribuyente no adquirió la propiedad de una parte relacionada.

  • El contribuyente no adquirió la propiedad de un miembro componente de un grupo controlado de corporaciones.

  • La base del contribuyente de la propiedad utilizada no se calcula en su totalidad o en parte por referencia a la base ajustada de la propiedad en manos del vendedor o el cedente.

  • La base del contribuyente para la propiedad usada no figura en la disposición para decidir la base de la propiedad adquirida de un difunto.

Además, el costo de la propiedad calificada utilizada elegible para la depreciación de bonificación no incluye ninguna base de arrastre de la propiedad, por ejemplo, en un intercambio de tipo similar o conversión involuntaria.

 

La nueva ley agregó cine calificado, televisión y producciones teatrales en vivo como tipos de propiedades calificadas que son elegibles para una depreciación de bonificación del 100 por ciento. Esta disposición se aplica a los bienes adquiridos y puestos en servicio después del 27 de septiembre de 2017.

 

Según la nueva ley, ciertos tipos de propiedad no son elegibles para la depreciación de bonificación. Una de estas exclusiones de la propiedad calificada es para la propiedad que se usa principalmente en el comercio o negocio de la provisión o venta de:

 

  • Servicios de eliminación de energía eléctrica, agua o alcantarillado,

  • Gas o vapor a través de un sistema de distribución local o

  • Transporte de gas o vapor por tubería.

Esta exclusión se aplica si las tarifas para amueblar o vender deben ser aprobadas por una agencia del gobierno federal, estatal o local, una comisión de servicios públicos o de servicios públicos, o una cooperativa eléctrica.

 

La nueva ley también agrega una exclusión para cualquier propiedad usada en un comercio o negocio que tenga financiamiento de planta. El financiamiento del plan de piso está asegurado por el inventario de vehículos de motor que una empresa vende o arrienda a clientes minoristas.

 

Cambios a las limitaciones de depreciación en automóviles de lujo y propiedad de uso personal

 

La nueva ley cambió los límites de depreciación para los vehículos de pasajeros puestos en servicio después del 31 de diciembre de 2017. Si el contribuyente no reclama la depreciación adicional, la deducción por depreciación más alta permitida es:

 

  • $ 10,000 por el primer año,

  • $ 16,000 por segundo año,

  • $ 9,600 por tercer año,

  • y $ 5,760 por cada año contributivo posterior en el período de recuperación.

Si un contribuyente reclama una depreciación de bonificación del 100 por ciento, la deducción por depreciación más alta permitida es:

  • $ 18,000 para el primer año,

  • $ 16,000 por segundo año,

  • $ 9,600 por tercer año,

  • y $ 5,760 por cada año contributivo posterior en el período de recuperación.

 

La nueva ley también elimina computadoras o equipos periféricos de la definición de propiedad listada. Este cambio se aplica a la propiedad puesta en servicio después del 31 de diciembre de 2017.

Cambios en el tratamiento de ciertas propiedades agrícolas

 

La nueva ley acorta el período de recuperación para maquinaria y equipos utilizados en un negocio agrícola de siete a cinco años. Esto excluye los contenedores de granos, los activos de desmotado de algodón, las vallas u otras mejoras de la tierra. El uso original de la propiedad debe ocurrir después del 31 de diciembre de 2017.

 

Este período de recuperación entra en vigencia para la propiedad puesta en servicio después del 31 de diciembre de 2017. Además, los bienes utilizados en un negocio agrícola y puestos en servicio después del 31 de diciembre de 2017 no están obligados a utilizar el método del saldo decreciente del 150 por ciento. Sin embargo, si la propiedad es de 15 años o 20 años, el contribuyente debe continuar utilizando el método del saldo decreciente del 150 por ciento.

 

Período de recuperación aplicable para bienes inmuebles

 

La nueva ley mantiene los períodos generales de recuperación de 39 años para bienes inmuebles no residenciales y 27.5 años para propiedades residenciales de alquiler. Sin embargo, la nueva ley cambia el período de recuperación del sistema de depreciación alternativo para la propiedad de alquiler residencial de 40 años a 30 años. Las propiedades de mejora de propiedades arrendadas calificadas, las propiedades de restaurantes calificados y las propiedades de mejoras minoristas calificadas ya no se definen por separado y se les otorga un período especial de recuperación de 15 años conforme a la nueva ley.

 

Estos cambios afectan la propiedad puesta en servicio después del 31 de diciembre de 2017.

 

Según la nueva ley, un comercio de bienes inmuebles o una empresa que elijan el límite de deducción de intereses debe usar el sistema de depreciación alternativo para depreciar cualquiera de sus bienes inmuebles no residenciales, propiedades de alquiler residencial y propiedades de mejoras calificadas. Este cambio se aplica a los años contributivos que comiencen después del 31 de diciembre de 2017.

 

Uso de un sistema de depreciación alternativo para las empresas agrícolas

 

Las empresas agrícolas que elijan el límite de deducción de intereses deben usar el sistema de depreciación alternativo para depreciar cualquier propiedad con un período de recuperación de 10 años o más, como estructuras agrícolas u hortícolas de propósito único, árboles o parras que lleven frutas o nueces, edificios agrícolas y ciertas mejoras de la tierra. Esta disposición se aplica a los años contributivos que comiencen después del 31 de diciembre de 2017.

Refund Transfer Facebook cover photo 201
Refund Transfer Facebook cover photo 201

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom
Refund Transfer Facebook cover photo 201
Refund Transfer Facebook cover photo 201

press to zoom
1/6